Tag Archives: James H. Trott

Weekend Wisdom: A Song Of The Eucharist

A lovely poem from the 1300’s in celebration of communion today, at least at the church where I belong.

A Song of the Eucharist

Eat ye this break, eat ye this bread,

Eat it so ye be not dead.

This bread giveth eternal life

Both unto man, to child and wife:

It yieldeth grace and bateth strife.

Eat ye it so ye be not dead.

It seemeth white, yet it is red,

And it is quick, yet seemeth dead,

For it is God in form of bread.

Eat ye it so ye be not dead.

This blessed bread is angel’s food,

Mannis also, perfect and good;

Therefore eat it with mild mood,

Eat ye it so ye be not dead.

This bread from heaven did descend

us fro all ill for to defend,

And to give us life without end,

Eat ye it so ye be not dead.

In Virgin Mary this bread was bake,

When Crist of her manhood did take,

Free of all sin mankind to make,

Eat ye it so ye be not dead.

Eat ye this bread withouten sin,

Eternal bliss then shall ye win.

God grate us grace to dwell therein!

Eat ye it so ye be not dead.

James Ryman (fl 1342) from A Sacrifice of Praise, second edition, An Anthology of Christian Poetry in English from Cademon to the Mid-twentieth Century. Edited by James H. Trott.

Bio: Michele Kearns is the founder and HUG© (Hope Unites Globally) Award-Winner of JoyReturns. She shares her widowhood adventures hoping to inspire widows to move through grief and rebuild their lives. A graduate of Kent State University with a Bachelor’s degree in communications, she’s currently using those skills as a virtual logistics contact center representative for a Fortune 100 company. She’s also managed call center teams, co-facilitated a grief support group, and helped small businesses with various writing assignments. Michele is a bookworm, and a lover of history, music, chocolate, red roses, and golden retrievers. She is also the amateur photographer behind the blog OgleOhio.com.

Thankfulness – Adelaide Anne Proctor

Happy Thanksgiving my dear readers! May you find a reason to give thanks even if you are grieving or working through another nasty life event.

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Here is a poem I found from A Sacrifice of Praise, Second Edition, An Anthology of Christian Poetry in English from Caedmon to the Mid-Twentieth Century; Edited by James H. Trott.

May you have a joy-filled Thanksgiving with family and friends.

Thankfulness

My God, I thank thee who hast made

The earth so bright;

So full of splendour and of joy,

Beauty and light;

So many glorious things are here,

Noble and right!

 

I thank thee, too, that thou hast made

Joy to abound;

So many gentle thoughts and deeds

Circling us round,

That on earth darkest spot of earth

Some love is found.

 

I thank thee more that all our joy

Is touched with pain;

That shadows fall on brightest hours;

That thorns remain;

So that earth’s bliss may be our guide,

And not our chain.

 

For though who knowest, Lord, how soo

Our weak heart clings,

Hast given us joys, tender and true,

Yet all with wings,

So that we see, gleaming on high,

Diviner things!

 

I thank thee, Lord, that though hast kept

The best in store;

We have enough, yet not too much

To long for more:

A yearning for a deeper peace,

Not known before.

 

I thank thee, Lord, that here our souls,

Though amply blest

Can never find, although they seek,

A perfect rest –

Nor ever shall, until they lean

On Jesus’ breast.

 

Adelaide Anne Proctor

(1825 – 1864)

 

Bio: Michele Kearns is the founder and HUG© (Hope Unites Globally) Award-Winner of JoyReturns. She shares her widowhood adventures hoping to encourage widows to move through grief and rebuild their lives. A graduate of Kent State University with a Bachelor’s degree in communications, she’s used those skills while working as a call center team leader, facilitating a grief support group and helping small businesses with various writing and administrative assignments. Michele is a bookworm, lover of golden retrievers and an amateur photographer.

 

Weekend Wisdom: Alfred Lord Tennyson

Forgiving

 

O Man, forgive thy mortal foe,

Not ever strike him blow for blow;

For all the souls on earth that live

To be forgiven must forgive. 

Forgive him seventy times and seven, 

For all the blessed souls in Heaven

Are both forgivers and forgiven! 

Alfred Lord Tennyson

From A Sacrifice of Praise, Second Edition, An Anthology of Christian Poetry in English from Caedmon to the Mid-Twentieth Century; Edited by  James H. Trott.

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